Stock Page.

Details of rolling stock in the care of the GCR Rolling Stock Trust.

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Stock List Page

Below may be found the current list of rolling stock in the custodianship of the Trust. This page provides details of each vehicle's history, where known, and restoration work underway... but we also urgently need skilled tradesmen who are prepared to volunteer their services on a part-time basis. If you feel you may be able to lend a hand please get in touch via the contact page.

No. 946, built 1888

No. 946 currently undergoing restoration
No. 946 currently undergoing restoration

No. 946 6-wheel 5-compartment carriage built by Manchester Sheffield & Lincolnshire Railway at the Gorton Manchester works to Parker design. Donated by Robert Drage and Tony Keeble. Former L.N.E.R. camping coach No. CC15. It ended its working days at Stratford locomotive works, being used as a boiler tube store and was then damaged in a Territorial Army exercise. This vehicle is currently undergoing restoration.

No. 946 is mentioned in the following news reports: 

No. 373, built 1889

No. 373 is our latest donation. This is a 6-wheel 5-compartment carriage also built by Manchester Sheffield & Lincolnshire Railway at the Gorton Manchester works to Parker design. Donated by Great Eastern Group, Anglia Railway Museum, Chappel. A former L.N.E.R. camping coach no CC35, it was first rescued in the 1970s.

No. 373 is mentioned in the following news reports: 

No. 1663, built 1903

No. 1663 (Photo courtesy of the Vintage Carriages Trust)
1st/3rd Class Brake No. 1663

No. 1663 bogie First/Third/Brake non-corridor carriage built by Ashbury to the design of John G. Robinson. Donated by Stuart Copson. This is body-only having been saved from Hull Kingston Rovers ground, used as a Tote office, became part of the Kim Brooker collection. Photo courtesy of the Vintage Carriages Trust.

No. 1663 is mentioned in the following news reports: 

No. 799, built 1905

No. 799 bogie 8-compartment non corridor suburban carriage built by G.C.R. at the Gorton Manchester works to the design of John G. Robinson. Donated by Stuart Copson. Former B.R. Departmental carriage and then owned by Hull Docks Engineer.

No. 799 is mentioned in the following news reports: 

No. ???, built 1905/06

Suburban 3rd brake body of 1905/6 built by Cravens
Suburban 3rd brake body of 1905/06 built by Cravens

Suburban 3rd brake body of 1905/06 built by Cravens. This carriage was recently rescued from Armthorpe (nr. Doncaster) after spending over 50 years in an orchard garden. It retains many original fittings such as door hinges, leather straps for the drop-lights, side ventilators and heavily wallpapered internal partitions including graffiti from the 1920s detailing the latest Yorkshire cricket scores!

No. ??? is mentioned in the following news reports: 

No. 228, built 1910

No. 228 (Photo courtesy of the Vintage Carriages Trust)
Barnum No. 228

No. 228 is one of the last four "Barnum" carriages, all now on site at Ruddington. It is a 3rd class open saloon for 64 people in two compartments, built by G.C.R. at the new Dukinfield Manchester works to the design of John G. Robinson that reveals heavy U.S.A. influence as also used in the Barnum & Bailey circus train. This vehicle was last used in Hull Docks where it was adapted for tomato growing. It is stripped down, awaiting a body lift to replace steel gussets prior to re-assembly. Part of the original Kim Brooker collection. Photo courtesy of the Vintage Carriages Trust.

No. 228 is mentioned in the following news reports: 

No. 664, built 1910

No. 664 (Photo courtesy of the Vintage Carriages Trust)
3rd Class Open Saloon No. 664

No. 664 is similar to No. 228, having been built the same year at the new G.C.R. Dukinfield works, and shows the sharp change in production methods compared with the earlier G.C.R. carriage building. It is a 3rd class open saloon for 64 people in two compartments, built by G.C.R. at the new Dukinfield Manchester works to the design of John G. Robinson. This was formerly owned by Main Line Steam Trust. Photo courtesy of the Vintage Carriages Trust.

No. 664 is mentioned in the following news reports: 

No. 666, built 1910

No. 666 (Photo courtesy of the Vintage Carriages Trust)
3rd Class Open Saloon No. 666

No. 666, with its sisters, shows how the G.C.R. aimed to exploit its more generous loading gauge, being higher and wider than all later B.R. types. It is a 3rd class open saloon for 64 people in two compartments, built with massive picture windows and extra long bogies for passenger comfort. Produced at the new Dukinfield Manchester works to the design of John G. Robinson. This vehicle is on loan from the National Railway Museum collection. Photo courtesy of the Vintage Carriages Trust.

No. 666 is mentioned in the following news reports: 

No. 695, built 1910

No. 695 (Photo courtesy of the Vintage Carriages Trust)
Barnum 3rd Class saloon/brake No. 695

No. 695 is a unique 3rd saloon/brake. It had seating with summer/winter coverings for 32 people in one compartment, built by the G.C.R. at Dukinfield Manchester works to the design of John G. Robinson, and was one of only six produced. The vehicle had the unusual feature of sliding doors to the baggage end, replicated at most of the early G.C.R. stations to separate the booking hall from the platform. All the Barnums, 38 vehicles in total, were built in just one year. Colour photo courtesy of the Vintage Carriages Trust.

Barnums as they were... No. 696
Barnums as they were... No. 696

Sister vehicle No. 696 is pictured here when first built with a rake of Barnum coaches. Note the distinctive N. American design influence and considerable overall dimensions, in contrast with contemporary and subsequent designs on British railways. The Barnums were built to take full advantage of the large continental-style loading gauge of the G.C.R. London Extension which itself was designed to take continental traffic via a Channel Tunnel to the north of England.

Completed perhaps too early, in 1898, without suitable fast connections across London, the south-east and a Channel Tunnel, the London Extension now lies derelict - a much misaligned subject of the 'Beeching cuts' in the 1960s. Ironically the southern connections are now in place yet this relatively modern, well-engineered northern counterpart has been lost.

No. 695 is mentioned in the following news reports: 

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G.C. Innovations

Under the management of Sir Sam Fay, the G.C.R. pursued an active publicity policy. A period slogan: "Rapid Travel in Luxury" is seen here below:

Rapid Travel in Luxury

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Content:  further details of this 1903 timetable may be found at Chris Tolley's site.


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